Clever Titles Are Hard

Excerpt from Julia Eshleman’s personal blog “Julia Nicole Eshleman” Julia is a Spring 2017 student from Messiah College. Reproduced with permission.

Okay, this is embarrassing. I wanted to write a post every other week… and five weeks have gone by since my last writing. Whoops.

There has been so, so much going on, and therefore, there will be a lot of skimming in this blog post. But tonight I have time to write, since my midterms are finally done (woohoo!).

Although I have only traveled within a few hours of my home so far, I feel like I’ve been to lots of new places in the past month. One of the most educational examples of this was when our entire Aboriginal culture class went to Stradbroke Island for a fiDSC_0405_editeld trip, and we were taught dances, practices and history from First Nations tribe members who knew our lecturer, Lea. Indigenous Culture, which I knew absolutely nothing about prior to coming here, is both fascinating and heartbreaking. As I learn more about the ways in which colonization has hurt this ancient, magical sort of people group, I have gained so much respect for Australian Aboriginal people; the way they view the spiritual realm, the land, and the connection between tribes is beautiful.

Stradbroke has some of the best views I have ever seen. It’s a small island; picture cliffs, brilliant waves, and very few businesses. I hope to head back to Straddie to go whale watching in the fall before I leave if I can(If you know me well, you will know exactly how I might feel about whale watching).

Although people ask me all the time if I get homesick, the sickness that worries me most is actually how I’m going to feel when I have to leave Australia in two months. There is just so much that I’m leaving behind. I’m going to miss watching the sunset in my backyard through the dining room window, and walking home from school. I’m going to miss singing worship songs at my church, and spending time with my friends. I’m going to miss having tea with the kind people at my service placement, and I’m going to miss eating dinner with my host family.

This is why even though I definitely miss parts of Montana and Pennsylvania life frequently, I cannot wish my time away. I know that I will go home in two months, unless something very dramatic were to happen. However, I don’t know if or when I will ever return to Australia. The thought is sad, but it influences me to be content in my circumstances- that thought and, of course, the fact that my circumstances are pretty sweet. There are times when I’m sad, or I miss people, but I could not possibly ask for a better place to be.

I’m actually going to write another blog post soon about my Spring Break trip to the Great Barrier Reef, so stay posted 🙂 As always, you guys should know that you can text, FaceTime, or email me whenever, and I love to hear from my friends in the states (or family members!) Thanks for being willing to listen to me ramble on yet again. I love you guys!

tuesdays are for heavy hearts

Excerpt from Marissa Showalter’s personal blog “Riss Lynn Takes Brisbane” Marissa is a Spring 2017 student from Messiah College.  Reproduced with permission.

Hi friends! It’s me again. Just procrastinating writing a paper and such, so instead I thought I’d write something just for the heck of it.

I just realized that I haven’t shared about my service placement yet, and I want to take a moment to do that because it is a super important part of my abroad experience. So every Tuesday while I am here, I volunteer in the mornings at Gateway Baptist Church in their Care Centre. This is also the church that I have been calling home since arriving in Brisbane, as every week I have been tagging along with my host family to the 10am service and the young adult service at 6pm.

I love volunteering at Gateway for soooo many reasons. Of course one of those reasons would be that I get to connect with more people who attend the church. And I have met such lovely individuals — people who truly want to do the Lord’s work and further His kingdom here on earth. It is a privilege to work with them every week and see the way God uses their willing hearts! I also love that I get to serve and affect lives for Christ even while overseas. As I wrote in my first blog post, my heart longs to be so much more than just a tourist during my time here. Being a part of an organization like the Care Centre allows that to become a much more tangible reality. I don’t want to simply be served and give nothing back to the community that has been giving me so much! I want to do my part as well.

One of my favorite aspects, though, would have to be the opportunity to interact with a part of the community that I wouldn’t usually have access to. I mean, I attend a private Christian uni, basically all of the friends I have met are church attendees, and my host family is Christian. I don’t have a lot of exposure to the marginalized society here aside from this opportunity. And how powerful it has been to rub shoulders with individuals who have been going through deeply troubling times. Australia is a place where life seems so incredibly perfect; the sun shines about ninety-nine percent of the time, people are friendly and cheerful, and everyone is always hanging out and having a good time. As one of my Aussie friends put it, “Life is just too good here!” In a world that seems so pristine, it is hard to imagine that there are people going through some truly harsh realties. The Care Centre helps put that into perspective for me.

Part of my job at the Care Centre is to package food to give out to those signed up for the On Track program, which assists those who are going through financial struggles. I also do interviewing with clients that are signed up for the program in order to help assess need and to check in to see where they are at in their lives (very reminiscent of social work-type duties). The Care Centre is a well-rounded program, offering assistance with food, clothing, household items, and also responding to emotional and spiritual needs.

Some days are nothing short of heartbreaking. Once we had a woman come in who had been evicted from her home the night before with a litter of young children to care for. Another day we had a Syrian refugee share the joy of the birth of his new baby boy, only to have that joy dimmed by fearfulness for the family he left behind in Syria and the unknown future his young family now faces in a new country with no connections and few provisions. We had another sad soul who shared her struggle with suicide and depression. I ache for these people who have been dealt such unfair hands in life. Tuesdays are for heavy hearts.

There is beauty in that pain, however. There is beauty in walking alongside these people and letting your heart break for them when theirs is already so fragmented that it can’t break any further. There is beauty in lending strength when the burdens that are borne are so heavy that they can’t be shouldered any longer. There is beauty in a smile that says that “sure, things aren’t great now — but you aren’t alone anymore.” And there is beauty in the resilience that I see as I stare into the eyes of those who have been battered, but not broken.

Tuesdays are for heavy hearts. But they are also for redemption and renewal, transmitting a hope that comes from Christ alone and the work that is being done to further His kingdom.

Thanks for reading friends.

xoxo, Riss

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I volunteer with two other Americans from ASC, Bethany Van Eps and Alyssa.
Bethany is the one pictured in this photo! They are both fantastic human beings

An Australian Adventure(r)

Excerpt from Bethany Van Eps’ personal blog “An Australian Adventure(r).” Bethany is a Spring 2017 student from Dordt College.  Reproduced with permission.

Hey all!
I swear I’ve been trying to write this blog post for like a week and a half now. Unfortunately, the fourth and fifth weeks of school (so last week and this week) in Australia marks the start of assessment due dates and increased reading requirements. It’s been a busy week and a half to say the least.

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Here’s an ultra-flattering picture depicting the humidity. I had just stepped out of the AirCon* of the bus and was going to walk home. My glass fogged up immediately.

But I am not complaining. I mean I’m in Australia! And the humid 80-degree weather won’t let me forget it. Last week we had heaps* of rain so the grass and trees have become increasingly vibrant and lush and I am now living in a tropical wonderland. It is gorgeous. Interestingly the rain here is different than at home. At home when it rains it gets a little cooler and the humidity is generally released from the atmosphere. Here however, after the rain it stays just as warm and muggy as it was pre-rain meaning you’re walking around in a greenhouse. The rain also comes in like 5 minute showers of varying intensity which is fun for walking and public transit. Let’s just say I bought a raincoat within two weeks of landing and am still working on my timing. Queensland weather, I tell ya what. Technically it was supposed to be autumn a few weeks ago but the summer heat has held out. I never thought I’d say I miss the cold, but living in a literal sauna has changed me.

We’re in the midst of week 6 here in Australia, which seems crazy. It feels like I’ve been here forever, but I credit that to very long, very full days. Some of my days have been fairly chill, but due to the whole ‘I’m on the other side of the world’ thing, each day is being treated as an adventure none the less. I’ve spent a fair amount of time in the Queensland State Reserve library, working on the piles of homework I’ve accumulated. With big windows overlooking the skyline and four floors of study space with big tables and comfy spinny chairs, it’s quickly become one of my favorite spots. Lots of coffee shops have been visited and lots of coffee has been drunken (drunk? drank?) as well. I honestly think I’m more hooked on it here than at Dordt, which quite frankly (with how often I visited 55th and the Bunsen Brew and how quickly I ran out of defender dollars last semester) is impressive.

Another area of this city I’m coming to love is just a short walk along the river from the library. South bank is this gorgeous area along that is right along the Brisbane river, situated next to the big ‘BRISBANE’ sign and the Eye of Brisbane (ferris wheel). It’s this really chill, semi-touristy area with some awesome features and some real good photo ops. There are two main pools; one is a normal pool surrounded by big rocks and the other is a sand-bottom pool attached to a man-made beach. Next to this is a splash park and kid’s pool area. Leading down the river a bit further is a mini, super shallow river area covered in and surrounded by rocks (perfect for sun baking*). It’s difficult to explain, but not at all difficult to enjoy. Every Friday night and Saturday afternoon the little side street of shops that runs parallel to the pools gets turned into a little street fair/market selling art, clothing, crafts, and food. I been many a time, with many a friend and I’ve loved every visit more than the last. 😊

I’ve been on a few awesome class field trips, but I think I’ll do a blog post dedicated specifically to non-Brisbane awesome-sauce a little later (when my list is a bit longer 😉). Sorry this was so very delayed! I’m going to try and get better at updating. I’ve been requested to comment on some differences in food, vocab, and other daily conveniences so stay tuned!

Love and blessings from Brisbane,

Bethany ♥

*Aussie Slang, look at me adapting to culture